LPC Releases Permit Application Guide

Credit: Berenice Abbott, 1937. Source: Museum of the City of New York.

Credit: Berenice Abbott, 1937. Source: Museum of the City of New York.

Are you an owner of a landmarked building or someone that files applications through the Landmarks Preservation Commission? If so, we want to point you to a helpful resource that the LPC has just released: the LPC Permit Application Guide. The guide can be found on our Resources page along with other useful information for property owners of landmarked buildings.

According to the LPC website,

“The LPC’s Permit Application Guide will help owners file complete applications that include the correct materials so our staff can review proposed projects and issue permits more expeditiously. The guide lists the materials that must be submitted, describes the criteria a project must meet to qualify for a permit, and explains the preservation principles for those criteria.”

Knowing what materials you need to provide to the LPC or how exactly you should fill out the application can be confusing. The guide aims to ease the process, which, in turn, should hopefully mean less back and forth between the applicant and their assigned LPC staff member when information is missing or incorrectly filled out.

Some of the more common types of work performed on landmarked buildings are listed below. Each link leads you to more in-depth information on how best to approach this kind of work, whether or not you actually need to apply for a permit, examples of historic architectural features, etc.

Awning Installation
Rear Yard and Rooftop Additions
Signage, Lighting & Fire Escapes
Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Equipment
Restoring Masonry, Roofs, Doors, Stoops, Fences and Handrails
Sidewalks, Sidewalk Cafés, Yards and Areaways
Storefronts in Historic Districts
Temporary Installations
Window Repair and Replacement

To fill out an application for work proposed for landmarked buildings and for additional information, access the LPC’s “Working with Landmarks” page. Of course, you can also track proposed work to our neighborhood landmarks through our innovative Landmarks Applications Webpage.


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avatar Amanda is GVSHP's Director of Preservation & Research