Author: lannyl

They Lived on West 9th Street: Ida Tarbell

Ida Tarbell was a trailblazing writer and investigative journalist –  although she famously did not like the term “muckraker” — who is best known for exposing the corrupt business practices of John D. Rockefeller and Standard Oil.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Mountaintop

On April 3rd, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered what would become both his last and one of his most powerful speeches, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.” In it, he called for unity and non-violent protests while challenging the United

Tennessee Williams: A Restless Fugitive

Born Thomas Lanier Williams, III, on March 26th, 1911, playwright Tennessee Williams was as much a New Yorker as anyone, really. While his place of birth was really Columbus, Mississippi, he was an itinerant traveler of the world, but spent

My Favorite Things: Women’s History Month Edition

When March finally rolls around, I feel the need for celebration! Not only does it mean that we have weathered the January/February doldrums, but also because March is Women’s History Month! We have several exciting programs in store for the

Dylan Thomas in New York: The Rock Star Poet at his Zenith

1950 was a seminal year in the life of the “last rock star poet,” Dylan Thomas. On February 20th of that year the much-celebrated Welsh poet arrived in New York to begin what would be the most exhilarating yet grueling

“Shampoo” and Other Inspirations Found on St. Mark’s Place

Shampoo, the iconic movie satire, is set on Election Day 1968, the day Richard Nixon was first elected President of the United States, and was released in 1975, soon after the Watergate scandal had reached its conclusion. The political atmosphere

Hats Off to John Guare

I’ll take Manhattan! If you had to draw a picture of a New York playwright, you would probably draw someone like John Guare.  Guare was born on February 5, 1938. A New Yorker’s New Yorker, he has lived in Greenwich

Disappearing New York: The Case of the Missing Watch Repair Shop

Like most of us who live and work in the city, it’s hard to imagine living or working anywhere else. I, myself, have struggled with this for many years. Where would I go if I left? Alas, I can think

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney’s Rich and Varied Legacy

When a woman born into the privileged class bucks the system and comes into her own as an artist and philanthropist, a great story is born. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney was decidedly born into the privileged class, on January 9, 1875.

My Favorite Things: Holiday Lights Edition

This is the latest installment of Off the Grid’s series, “My Favorite Things,” in which we showcase some of our very favorite spots around the neighborhood, highlighting the incredible architecture, history, people, and businesses of the Village, East Village, and

Top