Category: East Village

Labor History in the Village

Some of the most important events and most prominent figures in the labor movement bear strong connections to the Village and East Village.  Without these courageous individuals, or the events connected to them, we might never have had fair wages,

The Alamo Turns 50!

On November 1, 1967, an 8′ x 8′ x 8′ 1,800-pound giant black cube was installed in Astor Place as one of 25 temporary public artworks by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs. However, it was so popular that local residents petitioned the City

Two Village Ghost Stories!

As a surprise Halloween treat, this year’s Bowery Boys ghost stories podcast is focused all on the Village! While some of the stories are quite familiar to us at GVSHP, two particularly caught our eyes and ears: one about a

Honoring and Preserving 101 Avenue A, Home of the Pyramid Club

On October 30, 2007, GVSHP submitted a request to the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission that they consider 101 Avenue A (6th/7th Streets) in the East Village as an individual New York City landmark. The request attracted quite a bit of

The East Village’s Club 57 Gets A Show at MoMa

Who would have thought that the basement of a Catholic church would serve as a crucible of creativity in the East Village in the early Reagan era?  One did, however, and it is the subject of an upcoming exhibition at the

Fingers Crossed for Another: Individual Landmark Designations We’ve Won

We had a promising hearing last Tuesday at the Landmarks Preservation Commission on our proposed landmark designation of 827-831 Broadway, with a vote planned for this coming Tuesday, October 31st. We’re hoping for an outcome that will be more treat

This Day in Preservation History: Home of Alexander Hamilton (Jr.) is Landmarked

The Federal-style rowhouse at 4 St. Mark’s Place, also known as the Hamilton-Holly house and the former home of  Trash and Vaudeville, was designated an individual New York City landmark on October 19, 2004.  Landmark designation of the house was part

A Tale of Two 50’s!

Fifty years ago today, the musical Hair premiered at The Public Theater.  The first rock musical, it would go on to become a pacifist symbol throughout the world and bring groundbreaking innovations to the American musical theater genre.  As we remember

Murder He Wrote: Gruesome Tragedies That Shook the Village

Friday the 13th in October tends to bring to mind more thoughts of ghouls and goblins than Greenwich Village, but that doesn’t mean the neighborhood hasn’t had its fair share of historic horrors.  Jason may have taken Manhattan in the

Puerto Rico On Our Mind Entering Columbus Day Weekend

Puerto Rico is in our hearts and minds these days, both as the island continues to work towards a sustainable recovery after Hurrican Maria, and with the upcoming federal holiday named for Christopher Columbus.  Columbus landed on Puerto Rico in

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