Tag: Women’s House of Detention

Valerie Solanas: Questions, Context, and a Messy Legacy in the Village

Valerie Solanas (April 9, 1936 – April 25, 1988) is nothing if not divisive. She was a mysterious Villager known for being a radical lesbian feminist separatist, for writing the wild, controversial SCUM Manifesto, for shooting Andy Warhol and two others at

The Women’s House of Detention

To walk by the verdant, lush garden behind the graceful Jefferson Market Library today, one can scarcely imagine that it was once the site of an eleven-story prison, the notorious Women’s House of Detention. The latest addition to the GVSHP

Hunter S. Thompson: Iconoclast and Writer For Our Times

Where is a journalist like Hunter S. Thompson when you really need him (or her)? The wild and wooly world we live in is a mixed up brew of politics with a side shot of pop culture; just the firewater

Echoes of Bastille Day in Greenwich Village

On July 14, 1789, the Storming of the Bastille was the galvanizing event that kicked off the French Revolution.  The Bastille was a fortress-prison that held both political prisoners and a cache of weapons.  By storming the oppressive structure, the

April 19, 1927: Mae West Sentenced on Morals Charges at Jefferson Market Courthouse

“Miss West, are you trying to show contempt for this court?” “On the contrary, your Honor,” Mae sweetly responded. “I was doin’ my best to conceal it.” Known for her easy, breezy banter, laden with double entendre, Mae West was

This Day in History: The Rosenbergs are Convicted

The following is an updated re-posting originally authored by Dana Schulz. It was on this date in 1951 that the infamous Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were convicted of espionage.  The Jewish-American Communists, along with Soviet spy Morton Sobell, were accused

A Stroll Through the Garden: GVSHP members only event 6/17

Beside the Jefferson Market Library and behind the wrought iron fence between 6th and Greenwich Avenues and 10th Street lies the Jefferson Market Garden. You probably pass by it all the time, and maybe you’ve been inside, but the story

Tom Wolfe: New Journalism and the Women’s House of Detention

Acclaimed author and journalist Tom Wolfe is known for his use of New Journalism (employing fiction-writing techniques such as sustained dialogue, well-developed characters, and vivid scenes) and for his best-selling books including The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968) and The

W.P.A. Anniversary

On April 8, 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Emergency Relief Appropriation Act. This act granted the President the authority to establish programs such as the W.P.A. (Works Progress Administration, later renamed the Work Projects Administration) to combat the Great Depression.

In the News: 55 Years Ago Today

Much of the Village Voice from the 1950s to the mid-2000s is available to view online via a Google digitization project. The huge trove of scanned newspapers helps reveal the changes that have occurred over fifty years to the architecture

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