Author: Ariel Kates

Why Isn’t This Landmarked?: the Joseph J. Little Building on 28 East 14th Street

Part of our blog series Why Isn’t This Landmarked?, where we look at buildings in our area we’re fighting to protect that are worthy of landmark designation, but somehow aren’t landmarked. Where do the piano industry and radical workers’ rights …

Why Isn’t This Landmarked?: the Joseph J. Little Building on 28 East 14th Street Read More »

A Rebuilt Corner, a Carpenter House, and an Art Deco Beauty: New Additions to Our Greenwich Village Historic District Map

This is one in a series of posts marking the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  Check out our year-long activities and celebrations at gvshp.org/GVHD50.  On April 29th, 2019, we launched our new interactive map, …

A Rebuilt Corner, a Carpenter House, and an Art Deco Beauty: New Additions to Our Greenwich Village Historic District Map Read More »

Beyond the Village and Back: Congregation Shearith Israel

In our series Beyond the Village and Back, we take a look at some great landmarks throughout New York City outside of Greenwich Village, the East Village, and NoHo, celebrate their special histories, and reveal their (sometimes hidden) connections to …

Beyond the Village and Back: Congregation Shearith Israel Read More »

Romany Marie’s, Feeding and Defining Village Bohemianism

That village, the labyrinth of streets and lanes… into which those restless individuals seeking political or social or cultural change began settling after 1910 consisted mostly of buildings grown dingy since prosperous New Yorkers had begun moving northward…Marie was one …

Romany Marie’s, Feeding and Defining Village Bohemianism Read More »

How Greenwich Village and the East Village Launched the 19th Century Hebrew Free School Movement

Nineteenth-century Jewish immigrant life in New York is well-documented, when massive waves of Jews, first from Germany and then from Eastern Europe, began to flood into the city.  This made New York the largest Jewish city by population in the …

How Greenwich Village and the East Village Launched the 19th Century Hebrew Free School Movement Read More »

The Attica Prison Riots and the Village

The Attica Prison Riots, which took place September 9th through 13th, 1971, rocked the entire country. The bloodiest prison disturbance in recent American history, the riot was unplanned but ignited at a time of deep unrest among the prison population. …

The Attica Prison Riots and the Village Read More »

Khalil Gibran: An Immigrant Artist on 10th Street

Both the reach and the origins of those who have called the Greenwich Village Historic District home have always been international in scope; Khalil Gibran is a prime example of that broad reach. Born on January 6, 1883, in Lebanon, …

Khalil Gibran: An Immigrant Artist on 10th Street Read More »

Amelia Earhart: Aviatrix, Feminist Fashionista, Villager

This is one in a series of posts marking the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  Check out our year-long activities and celebrations at gvshp.org/GVHD50.  Aviatrix Amelia Earhart is a household name for shattering a record-breaking 18,415-foot glass ceiling …

Amelia Earhart: Aviatrix, Feminist Fashionista, Villager Read More »

Jewish History of the Greenwich Village Historic District

This is one in a series of posts marking the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  Check out our year-long activities and celebrations at gvshp.org/GVHD50.  With neighborhoods like the Lower East Side and Upper West Side in close proximity, …

Jewish History of the Greenwich Village Historic District Read More »

A little FUN Gallery with Patti Astor

“A long time ago in the 1960s, a young white girl from Ohio committed herself to being a revolutionary,” begins a short feature documentary about Patti Astor and her FUN Gallery (see within). FUN Gallery opened originally in the tiny …

A little FUN Gallery with Patti Astor Read More »

Top