Author: Lannyl Stephens

2020 Village Award Winner: Thompson Alchemists, 132 Thompson Street

Each year, Village Preservation honors the invaluable people, businesses, and organizations that make a special contribution to our neighborhoods at our Annual Meeting and Village Awards. This year, on June 17th, 2020 we will be celebrating nine outstanding awardees — …

2020 Village Award Winner: Thompson Alchemists, 132 Thompson Street Read More »

In Memoriam: African American Artists of Westbeth

It was a project like no other before.  The first subsidized housing for artists in the United States, offering affordable housing and work space in New York City, Westbeth is a large scale adaptive reuse of an industrial building for …

In Memoriam: African American Artists of Westbeth Read More »

Armand Hammer: Industrialist, Art Collector, Paradoxical Villager

Armand Hammer (May 21, 1898 — December 10, 1990), American industrialist most closely associated with Occidental Petroleum, was born on the Lower East Side to Russian immigrant parents and raised in the Bronx. He was, by all accounts, an eccentric …

Armand Hammer: Industrialist, Art Collector, Paradoxical Villager Read More »

Why Isn’t This Landmarked? Devonshire House, 28 East 10th Street

Part of our blog series Why Isn’t This Landmarked?, where we look at buildings in our area we’re fighting to protect that are worthy of landmark designation, but somehow aren’t landmarked. “Devonshire House” is a 13-story residential building designed in …

Why Isn’t This Landmarked? Devonshire House, 28 East 10th Street Read More »

Off Broadway Theater Update, Part 3

As we continue to work through the reality of this new era in our lives, it’s important to remember the creative people in our world and our neighborhoods.  They are striving to make sense out of the constrained circumstances we …

Off Broadway Theater Update, Part 3 Read More »

The Animal Rights Movement’s Origins (and still-visible legacy) in Greenwich Village

On the 19th of April in 1860, the New York state legislature passed a bill punishing an act, or omission of an act, that caused pain to animals “unjustifiably.” It was a historic step forward in the nineteenth-century movement toward …

The Animal Rights Movement’s Origins (and still-visible legacy) in Greenwich Village Read More »

Off Broadway Theater Update Part 2

The theaters in our neighborhoods have long been the critical launching pads for playwrights, directors, actors, and theatrical artists of all stripes.  As the Broadway lights were dimmed, for the time being, on March 12, 2020, Off Broadway Theaters struggled …

Off Broadway Theater Update Part 2 Read More »

Off-Broadway Theater Update

I have been thinking a great deal about our theater artist community in these past few days. So I decided to check in with some of the Off-Broadway theaters in our neighborhood to see how they are doing during this …

Off-Broadway Theater Update Read More »

Why Isn’t This Landmarked?: 815 Broadway

Part of our blog series Why Isn’t This Landmarked?, where we look at buildings in our area we’re fighting to protect that are worthy of landmark designation, but somehow aren’t landmarked. The area south of Union Square is rich in …

Why Isn’t This Landmarked?: 815 Broadway Read More »

Cultural Innovation Emanates From One Sheridan Square Throughout the Decades

The theater at 1 Sheridan Square has a long history as a vibrant, varied West Village performance space. Housed in a building constructed in 1834 by Samuel Whitmore, the space has had a fascinating life throughout the years in its …

Cultural Innovation Emanates From One Sheridan Square Throughout the Decades Read More »

Top