Author: Sam Moskowitz

Remembering a Big Day for East Village Landmarking

On March 18, 2008, the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved the designation of four East Village landmarks, and they were as varied as the East Village itself. They were the Webster Hall and Annex at 119-125 East 11th Street,

Peter Stuyvesant’s Bouweries and their Legacy Today

On March 12, 1651, Peter Stuyvesant, Director General of the Dutch West India Company, purchased Bouwerie (Dutch for ‘farm’) #1 and part of Bouwerie #2 in what is today’s East Village and surrounding neighborhoods. While it only remained farmland for

A Building-by-Building Tour of the East Village’s Kleindeutschland

From the mid-19th through the early 20th century, the East Village was the center of what came to be known as Kleindeutschland, or “Little Germany” – the largest German-speaking community in the world outside of Berlin and Vienna. It contained countless

Eight Years Off the Grid

GVSHP launched our blog Off the Grid on February 25, 2011, to share news, research, viewpoints, and historic information about our neighborhoods and beyond. Since then, we have written over 2,000 blog posts (wow!). In honor of our 8th Anniversary, we

A Prince of a House: No. 203 Prince Street

On February 19, 1974, the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to designate 203 Spring Street an individual landmark. This three-story house with red Flemish bond brickwork and brownstone basement was built in 1833-34 in a transitional style between Federal and Greek Revival.  In 2016,

Celebrate the Year of The Pig at These Local Favorites

The Chinese New Year or Lunar New Year is one of the most celebrated holidays in the world. February 5th, 2019 ushers in the Year of the Pig, the last year in the 12-year Chinese zodiac calendar-cycle. While most of the

Richard Upjohn — A Missionary for the Gothic Revival

British-born architect Richard Upjohn was born on January 22, 1802 in Sheffield, England. He moved to the United States in 1829, and in 1835 designed his first of many churches throughout the United States. He would go on to design over

James Varick, the Village, and Zion AME Church

On January 10th, 1750, James Varick was born into slavery in upstate New York. Possibly a slave of the prominent Dutch Varick family, as a young boy he and his mother were freed and moved to New York City. The church he helped found, what

2018 Favorites, and Looking to 2019….

Last week we looked at readers’ top five choices of 2018. Today, check out some of our favorites : Who Doesn’t Love Carole Teller? A resident of the East Village for over fifty years, Carole Teller so beautifully and thoroughly documented her neighborhood’s architecture,

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