Category: West Village

Otis Kidwell Burger, Who’s Seen the Village From Suffrage to Luxury

West Village history can’t be said to live in any one person, but Otis Kidwell Burger has seen a great deal of it, and holds a great deal more in her family tree. She grew up with abolitionists and suffragists,

Shop Local; Small Business Saturday

November 25th is Small Business Saturday to supporting shopping local small shops. We recently hosted an architectural walking tour of Bleecker Street to draw attention to the array of shops on that classic strip and are attending the small business

Labor History in the Village

Some of the most important events and most prominent figures in the labor movement bear strong connections to the Village and East Village.  Without these courageous individuals, or the events connected to them, we might never have had fair wages,

African Free School, First in America for Black Students, Found a Home in Greenwich Village

The African Free School was founded on November 2, 1787 in Lower Manhattan by the New-York Manumission Society and founding fathers Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. It was the very first school for blacks in America.  Ultimately consisting of seven schools, the

Two Village Ghost Stories!

As a surprise Halloween treat, this year’s Bowery Boys ghost stories podcast is focused all on the Village! While some of the stories are quite familiar to us at GVSHP, two particularly caught our eyes and ears: one about a

How Edith Wharton and Henry James Struck Up A Friendship Around Washington Square

On October 26, 1900, two great writers with ties to the Village began a correspondence that would spark a lifelong friendship…

Fingers Crossed for Another: Individual Landmark Designations We’ve Won

We had a promising hearing last Tuesday at the Landmarks Preservation Commission on our proposed landmark designation of 827-831 Broadway, with a vote planned for this coming Tuesday, October 31st. We’re hoping for an outcome that will be more treat

On West 13th Street, A Journal Founded By Transcendentalists, That Hit “Like An Atom Bomb”

Not many people remember it today, but The Dial, one of the most influential literary magazines of its time, was housed at 152 West 13th Street, and published some of the most groundbreaking work of the 20th century, including T.S. Elliot’s

The High Line is Dismantled and the West Side is Transformed

There’s no overstating it – we at GVSHP love our members and friends sharing old mementos and images of our neighborhood. Personal or family pictures taken of one’s surroundings or familiar spots often now become, years later, important historical documents. Case in

Happy Birthday, Richard Meier

American architect Richard Meier was born on this day in 1934. Over the course of his nearly sixty-year career Meier has designed countless buildings all over the world and received numerous prizes including the Pritzker Prize in Architecture in 1984, the

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