Tag: Civil Rights and Social Justice Map

African American, Feminist, & LGBTQ Solidarity at the Women’s House of Detention

The Women’s House of Detention, an eleven-story prison in the center of Greenwich Village, closed on June 13th, 1971. The prison was located on this site, between Greenwich Avenue, Sixth Avenue, Christopher Street, and West 10th Street for thirty nine …

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Chinese American Activists Fight for Their Rights in Our Neighborhoods

Our neighborhoods have been the home of many of history’s most important civil rights and social justice leaders, as documented in Village Preservation’s Civil Rights and Social Justice Map. Three of our lesser-known map locations, however, highlight the under-recognized stories …

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The Fight to Recognize LGBT Civil Rights History in Our Neighborhoods

On January 16th, 2013, Village Preservation sent a letter to the  New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) requesting that it landmark key sites of significance to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) history we had identified. At this time, …

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Looking Back On Our Civil Rights and Social Justice Map

Village Preservation’s Civil Rights and Social Justice Map was launched on January 3, 2017. This online resource, which marks sites in our neighborhoods significant to the history of various civil rights and social justice movements, includes over 200 locations. We’re …

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Richard Wright in Greenwich Village

This is one in a series of posts marking the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  Check out our year-long activities and celebrations at gvshp.org/GVHD50.  Richard Wright (September 4, 1908 — November 28, 1960), novelist and short-story author, is …

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African American History in the East Village

The East Village is probably not the first neighborhood that comes to mind when most New Yorkers think about African American history.  But this incredibly rich, multi-layered neighborhood was home to some remarkably consequential events, places, and figures in African-American …

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Alex Haley and the Village

The renowned writer Alex Haley was born on August 11 in 1921. In the 1960’s, the Haley rented a writing studio in the back of the Greenwich Village building at 92 Grove Street. It was here that Haley conducted over …

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Top Five Greenwich Village Moments in Fourteenth Amendment History

The Fourteenth Amendment, adopted on July 28, 1868, played an important role in setting legal precedents for equality after the Civil War. The most radically worded of the Reconstruction Amendments, it was intended by its post–Civil War Radical Republican sponsors to …

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Helen Keller’s Village Activist Life and Legacy

Helen Keller’s connections to New York City and Greenwich Village are numerous but perhaps less well known, as they are largely rooted in her work not as an advocate for the disabled, but in her sometimes controversial work as a suffragette, …

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Mountaintop

On April 3rd, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered what would become both his last and one of his most powerful speeches, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.” In it, he called for unity and non-violent protests while challenging the United …

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