Tag: Daytonian in Manhattan

Village Firehouse Architecture is HOT

The city might feel like its been on fire this record-breaking summer, but there have been times in the past when it has been. In the 1970s the Bronx was burning and Lower East Side was also suffering from fires

The Pepper Pot Inn, “The Realest Thing in Bohemian Atmosphere”

When searching through the chronicles of Greenwich Village history, some things almost seem too Village-y to be true, with all their quirky details and theatrical anecdotes. A prime example: The Pepper Pot Inn at 146 West 4th Street, a 1920s

If the Washington Square Hotel Could Talk (or Write, or Sing)

This is one in a series of posts marking the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  Check out our year-long activities and celebrations at gvshp.org/GVHD50.  In the 19th century, the neighborhood around the north side of Washington Square Park

A Tale of Two Forgotten Alexander Jackson Davis Mansions

Architect Alexander Jackson Davis was born on July 24, 1803.  Davis,  one of the most successful and influential American architects of his generation, is perhaps best known for his association with the Gothic Revival style of architecture and rural settings. 

The Art of the Artist’s Studio

This piece was originally posted in 2014 These beautiful late summer days have got us thinking about sun and sky. Which has us thinking about that most iconic of Village architectural features, the artist’s studio.  So we thought we’d use

Ten Years as Landmarks for Two Nearly Two Hundred Year Old Houses

On this day in 2007, two historic federal style row houses at 486 and 488 Greenwich Street (between Spring and Canal Streets) built in 1823 by the Rohr family were designated landmarks by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Kleindeutschland Roundup

In the late 19th and early 20th Century, the East Village and Lower East Side were home to a substantial German immigrant community.  As a result, this area became known as Kleindeutschland, or “Little Germany.”  Eventually the German community moved north

Landmarks50: The Andrew S. Norwood House, 241 West 14th Street

There are hundreds of individual landmarks in Manhattan alone – many in Greenwich Village, NoHo, the East Village and surrounding areas. In celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Landmarks Law, enacted in 1965, we’re taking a look at some of these

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