Tag: jewish history

How Greenwich Village and the East Village Launched the 19th Century Hebrew Free School Movement

Nineteenth-century Jewish immigrant life in New York is well-documented, when massive waves of Jews, first from Germany and then from Eastern Europe, began to flood into the city.  This made New York the largest Jewish city by population in the …

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Jewish History of the Greenwich Village Historic District

This is one in a series of posts marking the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  Check out our year-long activities and celebrations at gvshp.org/GVHD50.  With neighborhoods like the Lower East Side and Upper West Side in close proximity, …

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Happy Chanukah from the Village – Celebrating Through History!

I was holiday shopping at my local bookstore and was delighted to encounter Emily Jenkins’ “All of a Kind Family Hanukkah.” In the book, a Jewish immigrant family prepares for Chanukah in their Lower East Side Tenement in 1912. The …

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Beyond The Village and Back: the Statue of Liberty and “The New Colossus”

In our series Beyond the Village and Back, we take a look at some great landmarks throughout New York City outside of the Village, the East Village, and NoHo, celebrate their special histories, and reveal their (sometimes hidden) connections to the …

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Beyond The Village and Back: Temple Emanu-El, Reform Movement Builder and Shaker

In our series Beyond the Village and Back, we take a look at some great landmarks throughout New York City outside of the Village, the East Village, and NoHo, celebrate their special histories, and reveal their (sometimes hidden) connections to …

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The First Ghetto Is Founded, and the Reverberations are Felt Centuries Later

On March 29, 1516, the Venice Ghetto was established by decree of the Venice Ruling Council.  The very first ghetto, it was a tiny 2 1/2 block area on a small, dirty island housing over 4,000 people.  The name comes …

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Greek Revival Gone Wrong

On October 1, 2010, the New York State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed to GVSHP’s request to find 326 and 328 East 4th Street eligible for listing on the State and National Registers of Historic Places.  According to the significance statement issued …

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Five Hundred Years Ago, The First Ghetto Is Founded

Five hundred years ago today, on March 29, 1516, the Venice Ghetto was established by decree of the Venice Ruling Council.  The very first ghetto, it was a tiny 2 1/2 block area on a small, dirty island housing over …

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The Synagogues of East 6th Street

Today is Yom Kippur, so let’s take a look at some East Village buildings that are, or used to be, synagogues. Jewish immigrants to the East Village and Lower East Side were a significant segment of the population of these …

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What the Lower East Side Means to Me

The Lower East Side means many things to many people. Working as an architectural historian in New York City, it means a great deal to me. I always consider it a joy to travel the world and learn the history …

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