Tag: jewish history

The International Workers Order’s Fight to Protect All Americans, from 80 Fifth Avenue

For twenty four years, the entire existence of the organization, the International Workers Order (IWO) was headquartered at 80 Fifth Avenue (southeast corner of 14th Street), an elaborately-detailed Renaissance Revival style office building designed in 1908 by Buchman and Fox. …

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The Downtown Gallery and the Woman Behind the American Art Market

In 1926, Edith Gregor Halpert was twenty six years old. She had, up until the year before, served as one of two female business executives in New York City. But in 1925, she had left the elite position behind, her …

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Why Isn’t This Landmarked?: The Hebrew Technical Institute, 9th and Stuyvesant Streets

Part of our blog series Why Isn’t This Landmarked?, where we look at buildings in our area we’re fighting to protect that are worthy of landmark designation, but somehow aren’t landmarked. On December 1, 1917, the Evening Post wrote: “The …

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Beyond the Village and Back: Congregation Shearith Israel

In our series Beyond the Village and Back, we take a look at some great landmarks throughout New York City outside of Greenwich Village, the East Village, and NoHo, celebrate their special histories, and reveal their (sometimes hidden) connections to …

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How Greenwich Village and the East Village Launched the 19th Century Hebrew Free School Movement

Nineteenth-century Jewish immigrant life in New York is well-documented, when massive waves of Jews, first from Germany and then from Eastern Europe, began to flood into the city.  This made New York the largest Jewish city by population in the …

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Jewish History of the Greenwich Village Historic District

This is one in a series of posts marking the 50th anniversary of the designation of the Greenwich Village Historic District.  Check out our year-long activities and celebrations at gvshp.org/GVHD50.  With neighborhoods like the Lower East Side and Upper West Side in close proximity, …

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Happy Chanukah from the Village – Celebrating Through History!

I was holiday shopping at my local bookstore and was delighted to encounter Emily Jenkins’ “All of a Kind Family Hanukkah.” In the book, a Jewish immigrant family prepares for Chanukah in their Lower East Side Tenement in 1912. The …

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Beyond The Village and Back: the Statue of Liberty and “The New Colossus”

In our series Beyond the Village and Back, we take a look at some great landmarks throughout New York City outside of the Village, the East Village, and NoHo, celebrate their special histories, and reveal their (sometimes hidden) connections to the …

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Beyond The Village and Back: Temple Emanu-El, Reform Movement Builder and Shaker

In our series Beyond the Village and Back, we take a look at some great landmarks throughout New York City outside of the Village, the East Village, and NoHo, celebrate their special histories, and reveal their (sometimes hidden) connections to …

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The First Ghetto Is Founded, and the Reverberations are Felt Centuries Later

On March 29, 1516, the Venice Ghetto was established by decree of the Venice Ruling Council.  The very first ghetto, it was a tiny 2 1/2 block area on a small, dirty island housing over 4,000 people.  The name comes …

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